IAC announces 2007 leaders of Shared Interest Groups

The American Council for Technology’s Industry Advisory Council named the elected leaders of its Shared Interest Groups (SIGs) for 2007.

The nine SIGs will maintain their current goals and objectives, IAC said in a statement.

“The SIGs support IAC’s core mission by working with government leaders to determine focus areas for the year and then providing their shared expertise back to government as a trusted adviser,” IAC Chairman Bill Piatt said. “The candidates elected to lead the SIGs in 2007 will foster an ongoing dialogue between government and industry on the most relevant current topics.”

IAC members elected the SIGs’ leaders in the past two weeks. The new leaders are:

  •     Nancy Peters of CACI, who will head the Acquisition Management SIG.
  •     Gene Zapfel of Unisys, who will head the Collaboration and Transformation SIG.
  •     Steve Charles of Immix Group, who will head the Emerging Technology SIG.
  •     Mike Tiemann of the FEAC Institute, who will head the Enterprise Architecture SIG.
  •    Harold Youra of Alliance Solutions, who will head the Homeland Protection SIG.
  •    Gail Azaroff of Vertex Solutions, who will head the Human Capital SIG.
  •    Bob Dix of Citadel, who will head the Information Security and Privacy SIG.
  •    Tony Bardo of Qwest, who will head the Networks and Telecommunications SIG.
  •    Mike Fox of Fed 5 Corp., who will head the Small Business SIG.

"I look forward to the coming year as our SIGs continue to work with their government advisory panels to address key federal initiatives and coordinate the efforts of our member companies,” said Dan Matthews, IAC vice chairman for SIGs.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

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