Electronic Records Archive to debut in September

The first release of the National Archives and Records Administration's electronic archiving system will come in September, said NARA’s chief information officer, Martha Morphy.

Development of the Electronic Records Archive, a project that aims to collect and preserve government records in electronic format, could be supported by the Bush administration's proposed increase in funds for the project in fiscal 2008. The administration wants $58 million invested in ERA, which is $12 million more than the estimated fiscal 2007 funding.

“Right now we're in the development phase,” Morphy said. The goal for the first release would be to begin transferring and processing information directly from agencies to ERA, she said. Currently, four agencies submit information to NARA’s electronic archiving: the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Naval Oceanographic Office and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. More agencies could be added to the program this year.

Morphy also said that the ERA development team hopes to be able to make the archive searchable, increase storage and processing power, and create a version of the system that would handle classified data.

This second system would primarily be developed to preserve e-mail messages, documents and Web pages of the Bush administration, specifically for the future George W. Bush Presidential Library. The proposed budget stipulates that $38 million of the funds could be used until September 2009 for archiving the administration's information.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.