DHS needs to wrap up effort to protect personal data, IG says

DHS’s Implementation of Protective Measures for Personally Identifiable Information

The Homeland Security Department still must do a lot of work to ensure the security of sensitive and personally identifiable information that is stored on its systems, according to the DHS inspector general.

DHS officials are working on the problem, falling in line with guidelines issued by the Office of Management and Budget on security controls, according to a memorandum from IG Richard Skinner. They have updated DHS policies and procedures to reflect OMB's recommendations, and they have begun the process of identifying and protecting systems that store sensitive data.

But they have a long way to go, the memo states. The IG is especially concerned about mobile devices. For example, 12 of 16 component agencies in DHS have yet to encrypt sensitive information on their laptops and other mobile computing devices.

Agency officials say they are running into problems with hardware limitations, insufficient software licenses and incomplete inventories, according to the memo, but they say they are making progress.

“Until adequate encryption mechanisms have been implemented, there is increased risk that sensitive data or [personally identifiable information] may be compromised through the loss or theft of laptop computers and mobile computing devices,” the IG stated.

The IG is also concerned that the department has not followed OMB guidelines for protecting systems that can be accessed by remote users. In their interviews with officials at component agencies, the IG's office found that their efforts to improve remote access and storage controls were hindered by “uncertainty regarding the applicability and scope of the OMB recommendations and new DHS requirements.”

The IG recommends that the department's chief information officer identify those gray areas and provide additional guidance.

The IG also recommends:

  •  The chief privacy officer should ensure that the department wraps up the inventory of affected systems.
  •  The CIO should ensure that DHS agencies encrypt all personal data stored on laptop computers and mobile devices, as well as data transported and stored at alternate facilities.
  •  The CIO should also improve the security of electronic copies or extracts of personal data. Such data should be erased within 90 days if no longer required.

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