FlipSide: FCW@20: Fed 100 awards

Federal Computer Week looks at some snapshots of past Fed 100 award events

Federal Computer Week is celebrating its 20th year, but 2007 marks only the 18th year of the Federal 100 awards program. Fed 100 began in 1991 as an event to accompany the FOSE trade show. What we now call the Eagle awards — given to one government and one industry person selected from among the Fed 100 — were previously called the FOSE awards.

The photo captions coincide with the order of the pictures, from top to bottom.

1991: FCW staff members at the Fed 100 banquet, including Anne Armstrong (second from the right), who is now president and group publisher of FCW’s parent company, 1105 Government Information Group.

1993: Eagle award winners Bob Woods (left), who was then deputy assistant secretary for information resources management at the Department of Veterans Affairs, and Dendy Young, who was then president of Falcon Microsystems.

1993: Philip Kiviat (center), now a principal at consulting firm Guerra Kiviat, is a 2007 Fed 100 award winner. But 14 years ago, he was vice president of federal programs for Knowledge Ware — and he was a Fed 100 judge.
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