Sprint will not protest Networx decision

Sprint Nextel has decided not to protest its unsuccessful bid on the General Services Administration’s multibillion-dollar Networx Universal telecommunications contract.

Company and GSA officials confirmed that after Sprint’s debriefing earlier this week, Sprint decided to let the governmentwide acquisition contract move forward instead of holding it up with a protest to the Government Accountability Office or the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

“After a thorough discussion, Sprint has decided to move forward and focus on the future and continue to aggressively pursue the forthcoming Networx Enterprise contract,” a Sprint spokeswoman said.

GSA awarded Networx to three companies last week: AT&T, Verizon and Qwest. Sprint was the one unsuccessful bidder for Universal. GSA expects to award Networx Enterprise in May.

Networx Universal will take over for the expiring FTS 2001 contract as the primary contract vehicle for agencies to use in procuring telecommunications and network services

John Johnson, GSA’s assistant commissioner for integrated technology services at the Federal Acquisition Office, was pleased with Sprint’s decision.

“I think the fact they don’t want to protest or chose not to would indicate there are not any irregularities,” he said. “We always valued our relationship with Sprint, and they still are providing services under extension bridges for FTS 2001.”

Johnson also said the program is moving along well and he expects a notice to proceed shortly.

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