OPM: Reorganization makes CHCO Council more flexible

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The federal Chief Human Capital Officers Council made improvements in its structure and organization in 2006 that make it more adaptable and responsive to the needs of agencies and their workforces, Office of Personnel Management Director Linda Springer said.

Commenting on the CHCO Council's annual report to Congress, which was issued April 12, Springer said the council "must be on the cutting edge of change" and that the organizational changes give it more flexibility to help CHCOs maintain their effectiveness.

According to the report, key changes made to the council's organization include:
  • Restructuring and realigning the council's subcommittees to create six new subcommittees to oversee federal workforce issues.
  • Appointing deputy CHCOs to serve on the council to forge stronger links between the council and federal human resources directors and to ensure continuity when there are changes in leadership among the CHCOs.
  • Improving the CHCO Council Training Academy by opening its sessions to CHCOs, deputy CHCOs and other HR specialists from their agencies. In the past, sessions were open to CHCOs only.
The new subcommittees are: Emergency Preparedness, Hiring and Succession Planning, Human Capital Workforce, Human Resources Line of Business, Learning and Development, and Performance Management. Late last year, the council adopted mission statements and goals for each subcommittee, the report states.

The 25-member CHCO Council was created under the CHCO Act of 2002, which required executive departments and agencies to appoint CHCOs and form a council under the direction of OPM and the deputy director for management of the Office of Management and Budget.

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