USPS shifts to electronic personnel records

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U.S. Postal Service employees will soon have access to their personnel records at all times when the service switches from a paper-based to a digital system.

The agency awarded a contract April 13 to Sourcecorp BPS to make the transition.

Officials say they have anticipated employees' potential concerns about the privacy and security of their confidential records and taken steps to address those concerns. According to USPS, the electronic versions of the files will reside in a secure central database, unlike the paper files, which are housed in various buildings nationwide.

“The safety and security of our employee records is a top priority,” said Anthony Vegliante, USPS’ chief human resources officer and executive vice president, in a press release.

USPS' Electronic Official Personnel Folder program also supports the Human Resources Shared Service Center and disaster recovery programs, the agency said.

The switch from paper to electronic forms is another phase of the PostalPeople project, which seeks to streamline human resource processes by replacing outdated technology with a fully integrated system. The project helps USPS increase efficiency and reduce costs, the agency said.

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