Orange County to revisit outsourcing numbers

Orange County, Calif. plans to compare specific job classifications when it revisits a preliminary take on in-house versus outsourced labor costs for information technology services.

The county released a series of charts, dated April 11, that provide a comparison of the county’s IT staffing cost and that of outsourcing contractor Affiliated Computer Services (ACS). Orange County’s IT work is performed by 419 county employees and 184 ACS staffers, according to the county. The cost comparison found little difference between county and contractor labor costs: ACS services came in at an average annual cost per employee of $119,500, while the figure for county employees was $120,223. 

Orange Co.'s IT department undertook the cost comparison, with assistance from the county’s auditor-controller department. The assessment took salary and benefits for IT staff members into account. But David Sundstrom, the county’s auditor-controller, said the cost comparison didn’t directly compare specific job classifications, such as programmers, architects, and database administrators.

Sundstrom said a subsequent look into labor costs will seek to provide a head-to-head comparison of job categories. “I think we can get some comparisons,” he said. “I have asked for a more detailed assessment.”

As the exploration of labor rates continues, Sundstrom noted that cost is among many elements that factor into outsourcing. He cited the ability to obtain just-in-time IT resources as a key consideration.

“An advantage of our services is the flexibility our contract allows, and in fact, we've utilized that flexibility several times during the course of this contract,” said Kevin Lightfoot, vice president of corporate communications at ACS.

“ACS has been working closely with Orange County as their technology partner for several years, and we continue to focus on providing the county with the services necessary to help the government serve the needs of local residents,” he added.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.