Tech to monitor offenders isn't enough

Using the type of technology addressed in "Offenders under electronic watch" in Federal Computer Week's May 28, 2007, issue, with the idea that even one crime will be stopped is giving the public a false sense of security. Since these contraptions only monitor where you are and not what you are doing, they are relatively useless. Because most child molestation happens between a child and adult who know each other, the crime most likely occurs in the home of the victim or the perpetrator. It does not happen at a school, park, bus stop, etc. Until these systems can monitor intent, I resent that my tax dollars are being used to the fund them.

Leah Simon

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