FAS names new deputy commissioner

Barney Brasseux is the new deputy commissioner for the General Services Administration’s Federal Acquisition Service, the agency announced today.

Brasseux became acting deputy after Marty Wagner retired in February. Brasseux also was FAS’ assistant commissioner for the Office of Travel, Motor Vehicles and Card Services.

In the new role, Brasseux oversees the acquisition of more than $46 billion in products goods and services for agencies, and manages FAS’ 4,000-person workforce. The programs he directs include those through which agencies get information technology services, the government’s major contracts for obtaining telecommunications and the management of more than 200,000 motor vehicles. He also oversees programs providing disaster relief for hurricane victims, equipment for the armed forces, travel arrangements for federal travelers and the use of charge cards.

In 1993, Brasseux joined GSA’s Federal Supply Service, which officially merged with the Federal Technology Service to form FAS last month. He has held a variety of positions at the agency in travel and transportation, services acquisition, and automotive organizations. He was also chief of staff. A past chairman of the FSS Management Council, Brasseux was appointed in 2001 assistant commissioner for vehicle acquisition and leasing services.

“The skills, knowledge and energy that Barney has already demonstrated as acting deputy commissioner give me great confidence in his ability to lead the Federal Acquisition Service in this role,” FAS Commissioner Jim Williams said.

Featured

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image 1658927440 By Deliris masks in office coronavirus covid19

    White House orders federal contractors vaccinated by Dec. 8

    New COVID-19 guidance directs federal contractors and subcontractors to make sure their employees are vaccinated — the latest in a series of new vaccine requirements the White House has been rolling out in recent weeks.

  • FCW Perspectives
    remote workers (elenabsl/Shutterstock.com)

    Post-pandemic IT leadership

    The rush to maximum telework did more than showcase the importance of IT -- it also forced them to rethink their own operations.

Stay Connected