FBI plans to integrate nationwide gang data

Department of Justice IT systems integration

The FBI seeks proposals to develop and integrate gang intelligence analysis and workflow capability for its National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) to support law enforcement.

The center, established in 2005, collects, analyzes and shares data about the growth, migration and criminal activities of gangs for federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement. The FBI plans to modernize and integrate the center’s disparate systems and provide more connectivity with other regional networks with gang-related intelligence.

Currently, NGIC does not possess a centralized information system that can receive, store, manipulate or exchange gang information, including photographs and other identifiers, from federal, state and local law enforcement. In addition, the center does not connect to either the Regional Information Sharing System Network or GangNet, two major gang intelligence systems that law enforcement agencies nationwide use. NGIC participants agree that equal and equitable information sharing is a key to the center’s success.

The vendor also would develop and integrate other electronic capabilities for the center, such as providing a single point of entry for gang-related intelligence analysis and a Signs, Symbols and Terminology database that identifies the characteristics of gangs and facilitating information sharing among law enforcement agencies.

The NGIC information technology support system will be a sensitive-but-unclassified system.

The contract would have a one-year base period and four option years. The base period will start one year from the award date. Proposals are due July 9.

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