GPO chooses new acquisition chief

Announcement of Fish's appointment (.pdf)

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Dean Fish, who has held positions in information technology firms, will head the Government Printing Office’s purchasing program, the agency announced today.

As chief acquisition officer, Fish will direct and plan the management of GPO’s acquisition program, including the agency’s purchases of technical and information systems. The position is a career position under the Federal Merit Promotion Program.

The move comes as GPO is making a major push to digitize its collections of government publications and make them searchable and publicly accessible online.

Most recently Fish led two technology-focused groups at Booz Allen Hamilton. Before that, he worked at Dynamics Research as director of its operations research, modeling and simulation development group.

“GPO welcomes his experience and leadership as the agency moves forward in its transformation into a world-class digital information operation,” Acting Public Printer William Turri said in a press release.

Fish also served in the Marine Corps for 20 years and earned a Ph.D. in business administration from the University of Phoenix this year.

GPO produces and distributes materials for all three branches of the federal government, and makes the information available to the public by selling publications through partnerships with libraries and for free online through GPO Access.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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