GSA's Carleton selected as HHS CIO

HHS launches next round of NHIN contracts

Michael Carleton, chief information officer at the General Services Administration, will become CIO at the Department of Health and Human Services, where he began his federal career. He starts July 23.

HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt today announced Carleton as his choice for CIO and deputy assistant secretary for information technology at the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Resources and Technology.

Carleton replaces Charles Havekost, who resigned earlier this month to take a position at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria.

Carleton will oversee the department’s IT resources, program systems and infrastructure. He will also promote performance gains using enterprise architecture, capital planning and investment. Among other issues, HHS is consolidating data centers, modernizing Medicare claims processing, standardizing Medicare financial management systems, promoting the establishment of a nationwide health information network and transforming business systems at the National Institutes of Health.

“His career successes demonstrate his understanding of not only the importance of technology in delivering information to our citizens, but also the need to identify new and innovative ways to add value,” Leavitt said in a statement.

Carlton was GSA CIO for seven years. In that role he worked to improve the agency’s customer facing Web presence, IT infrastructure operations, computer security, and capital planning and investment control. Before working at GSA, Carleton was HHS’ deputy director of the Office of Information Resources Management and CIO for the Office of the Secretary.

Carleton holds a Master of Science in Information Resources Management from Syracuse University and a Master of Public Administration from Northeastern University.

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