DNI rolls out joint duty program

DNI Joint Duty Announcement (.pdf)

Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell has kicked off a new program that makes interagency tours mandatory for senior intelligence officers, according to a June 26 statement from his office.

The program is similar in scope to joint duty in the military, according to the statement. Officers there are required to complete joint assignments if they want to advance to the more senior service ranks.

McConnell signed the implementing instructions for the intelligence community’s joint duty program June 25. According to the document, all intelligence employees to be promoted above General Schedule 15 must now complete a 12-month tour in another intelligence agency.

“Joint duty is one of the most important elements of the [intelligence] community’s transformation, and I am absolutely committed to providing the opportunity for our professionals to grow and develop successfully,” McConnell said.

The new program is part of McConnell’s 100-Day Plan, which seeks to implement requirements in the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, according to the statement.

After the 2001 terrorist attacks, lawmakers urged improved information sharing among the various organizations of the intelligence community.

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