IG finds FEMA's laptop security faulty

"Improved Administration Can Enhance Federal Emergency Management Laptop Computer Security" (.pdf)

Related Links

The Federal Emergency Management Agency does not have effective procedures to protect information contained on its laptop computers, according to a new report from Richard Skinner, the Homeland Security Department’s inspector general.

The IG tested 298 of the 32,000 laptop computers FEMA has in its inventory and discovered significant shortcomings in the agency’s ability to set security configurations, conduct patching to remedy vulnerabilities and manage its inventory.

“As a result, sensitive information stored and processed in FEMA’s laptop computers may not be protected properly,” Skinner wrote in the report.

The same ineffective configurations extend to FEMA’s desktop computers, suggesting that the problem is widespread throughout the agency, the report states.

Skinner said his staff was unable to review FEMA’s compliance with the requirements of the Federal Information Security Management Act because the agency did not have a complete inventory of its laptop computers.

FEMA officials agreed with the IG’s report.

Alice Lipowicz writes for Washington Technology, an 1105 Government Information Group publication.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Shutterstock photo id 669226093 By Gorodenkoff

    The disinformation game

    The federal government is poised to bring new tools and strategies to bear in the fight against foreign-backed online disinformation campaigns, but how and when they choose to act could have ramifications on the U.S. political ecosystem.

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.