Lawmakers want database for contractor accountability

To improve accountability in government procurement, two Democratic lawmakers are promoting the creation of a centralized database that tracks contractor performance and fraud governmentwide.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) introduced the Contractors and Federal Spending Accountability Act (H.R. 3033) to create a comprehensive database to monitor the federal procurement system. The bill is co-sponsored by Rep. Ed Towns (D-N.Y.), chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform’s Government Management, Organization and Procurement Subcommittee. Maloney is a subcommittee member.

“Right now, there is nothing stopping a fraudulent contractor from bouncing from federal agency to federal agency, fleecing U.S. taxpayers the whole way,” Maloney said in a statement. “Congress can and should do more to fortify the federal procurement system, and show the door to contractors lining their pockets at the expense of hardworking taxpayers.”

Maloney cited work by the Project on Government Oversight, a nonprofit group, increasing a Federal Contractor Misconduct Database as a source of examples of contractors who have been subjected to settlement fees, fines and penalties for alleged wrongdoing yet continue to receive federal contracts.

Maloney’s bill would strengthen the role of the Interagency Committee on Debarments and Suspension. It also would require the administrator of the General Services Administration to report to Congress within 180 days with recommendations for creating the database.

Alice Lipowicz writes for Washington Technology, an 1105 Government Information Group publication.

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