CIO, CTO at printing office pull job switch

GPO announces new leader (.pdf)

The chief information officer and chief technical officer at the Government Printing Office will swap roles to help the agency meet its strategic goals, the agency announced today.

The switch has Reynold Schweickhardt, the current CIO, trading places with Michael Wash, GPO’s CTO. Although the officials will continue to work on current projects in their new roles, the move will allow the agency to best use each executive’s skills and experience, said Caroline Scullin, an agency spokeswoman.

The decision and the timing of the move are consistent with the agency’s overall strategic vision, she added.

As CIO, Schweickhardt has headed the agency’s planning and information system and was very involved in the planning and rollout of the new e-Passports. Before joining GPO, he also was director of technology at the House Administration Committee. GPO says his longstanding relationships with government and industry leaders will help the agency improve its security and technology structures.

During his tenure as CTO, Wash has been working on GPO’s searchable digital content system, the Future Digital System (FDsys). As the new CIO, he will be able to help the agency launch FDsys and fully implement it in the agency’s overall information technology structure, Scullin said. The agency is planning an initial public launch of FDsys for early 2008.

“I am excited at how, together, they can continue to seek out and implement technology to accelerate the digital transformation of the GPO into a 21st-century information organization utilizing leading edge solutions to provide the highest quality government information services to the nation,” William Turri, GPO’s acting public printer, said.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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