Security article has holes

Jacob, I enjoyed your article, "Software that stops data breaches," but was left wondering if you were doing an expose on preventing information security leaks or on a specific category of technology. The readers who need the independent source of information are the government workers who need to use the appropriate measures, the users who need to know that there are ways their information technology teams are trying to help them, and agency managers who need to determine where to best spend their budgets to prevent breaches.

You did not mention enterprise rights management technology, which offers persistent encryption regardless of where the information resides and controls access and usage based on organizational policies and the role of the information consumers. Some brands even offer detailed auditing of all the activities occurring with the protected information in addition to making the protection and application of this security methodology transparent to the end user -- so much so that business productivity increases after deployment. Good news for agencies and users wanting to avoid mistakes that can lead to breaches, bad news for authorized and unauthorized users with malicious intent.


Craig Chapman
Liquid Machines

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