OPM's Enger leaves legacy of e-government

OPM adds three to help lead e-gov projects

The Office of Personnel Management’s leader for the Human Resources Line of Business and E-Government efforts retired July 31.

Norm Enger, who came to government after retiring from the private sector, left after more than five years at the helm of five e-government initiatives and the Human Resources LOB.

OPM named Joe Campbell as acting director, and an agency spokesman said the job will be advertised.

Enger came to OPM in April 2002 to lead five e-government initiatives—E-Clearance, Enterprise Human Resources Integration, E-Payroll, E-Training and Recruitment One-Stop. After successfully moving agencies to one of four federal E-Payroll providers, the Office of Management and Budget tapped Enger to lead the broader Human Resources LOB effort.

Under the Human Resources LOB, Enger led the move to develop requirements first for public shared-services providers and later for the private sector. He brought a majority of agencies to agreement on standards and developed a set of enterprise architecture reference models.

Enger left just as OPM and the General Services Administration were evaluating private sector bids to become Human Resources LOB providers to agencies. Enger said previously that he expected awards in late summer.

Before coming to government, Enger was vice president of Computer Associates International Inc., where he developed business strategies and managed services and products for commercial and federal customers.

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