Union president wrong about NSPS

In "Union to take NSPS case to Supreme Court," Richard Walker wrote, American Federation of Government Employees President John Gage "added that if [the National Security Personnel System] were to be fully implemented, DOD workers 'would be subjected to an arbitrary, dishonest and unfair working atmosphere.'" I like Gage's reasoning. That means that most workers in the real world -- in other words, not government workers -- are working in what he would consider "arbitrary, dishonest and unfair working atmosphere" conditions.

I can't speak for most union jobs, but for most of my working life I had to perform better than my coworkers if I wanted to get a better raise than they got. I guess that was wrong. I should have been able to sit on my hind end and watch my coworkers work and still get the same benefits. Anything else is demeaning. And yes, there are problems with the real-world equivalent of NSPS, just as there are problems with the Civil Service system, but I think most people who work for a living would take offense at Gage's comments. (Personally I like the old Civil Service-type system over the new NSPS-type system -- do not have to work as hard.)

Anonymous
Air Force

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