Army extends work on deployment database

The Army intends to award DeticaDFI a sole-source contract for the continued operation and development of a database containing information about all Army deployments since Sept. 11, 2001, according to a notice posted on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site and several service officials.

The Army tasked the U.S. defense contractor DFI International to develop the Army Operational Employment Database in 2002, according to an Army official with knowledge of the matter. The move was in response to the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review, which concluded the ground service needed better tools to analyze trends in the deployments of its active and reserve components, the Aug. 16 notice states.

DFI merged with the United Kingdom-based Detica Group in April, after the Committee for Foreign Investment in the United Stated approved the deal. The new company, DeticaDFI, is headquartered in Washington. Its president is retired Gen. Dennis Reimer, who served as Army chief of staff from 1995 to 1999.

According to the notice, the Army is looking to DeticaDFI to update and maintain the Army Operational Employment Database program to keep its records current. In addition, the company is supposed to tweak the database so service officials can quickly analyze “emerging force management issues,” the notice states.

The new contract would start on Sept. 30, 2007 and end on Sept. 29, 2008, the document states. The current contract with DFI International expires in April 2008, according to the service official.

Army analysts can use the AOED to separate out information on different mission types, like counterterrorism and irregular warfare operations, out of all global Army deployments, the notice states. Senior Defense Department officials need the information to make far-reaching decisions pertaining to the composition and strength of the ground service.

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