Treasury names Justice IT official as CIO

The Treasury Department has named Michael Duffy, deputy CIO of e-government at the Justice Department, its new chief information officer. He will start Sept. 10, a Treasury spokeswoman said.

Duffy has led development of the Integrated Wireless Network, which Justice is building in partnership with Treasury and the Homeland Security Department to improve information sharing among those agencies nationwide. He also manages Justice’s e-government program and coordinates departmentwide policy for information technology.

Duffy has held other senior IT management positions at Justice, including director of telecommunications, director of information management and security, and program manager of the Justice Consolidated Office Network.

Ed Roback, Treasury’s first associate CIO for cybersecurity, has been acting CIO in addition to his security duties since Ira Hobbs retired in January. Duffy will report to Peter McCarthy, Treasury’s assistant secretary for management and chief financial officer, who started in that position earlier this month.

Duffy earned his bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, and his master’s from the University of Massachusetts in Boston.

About the Author

Mary Mosquera is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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