Telework and the boomers’ coming retirement tsunami

Federal agencies are bracing for a massive exit of experience and talent in the next few years as baby boomers, who make up a large share of the federal workforce, begin to retire. Managers hope that at least some of them will forgo the golf course for the telework option and will stick around to teach younger employees the tricks of the trade.

Many managers who will be eligible for retirement in the next five to 10 years might enjoy training younger employees or working part time, said Michael O’Leary, a program manager at the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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