Telework and the boomers’ coming retirement tsunami

Federal agencies are bracing for a massive exit of experience and talent in the next few years as baby boomers, who make up a large share of the federal workforce, begin to retire. Managers hope that at least some of them will forgo the golf course for the telework option and will stick around to teach younger employees the tricks of the trade.

Many managers who will be eligible for retirement in the next five to 10 years might enjoy training younger employees or working part time, said Michael O’Leary, a program manager at the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.