Air Force names Lord to lead Cyber Command

Air Force Secretary Michael Wynne announced today that he appointed Maj. Gen. William Lord as commander of the Air Force Cyber Command.

Lord currently is the director for cyberspace transformation and strategy in the Secretary of the Air Force Office of Warfighting Integration. In that capacity, he is responsible for establishing cyberspace as an Air Force domain and for the development of doctrine, strategy and policy with respect to cyberspace.

Lt. Gen. Robert Elder, commander of the 8th Air Force at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., has been heading up Air Force cyberwarfare operations since earlier this year.

Before assuming his current position, Lord commanded the 81st Training Wing in Keesler Air Force Base, Miss.

The Air Force announced it would create a Cyber Command in November 2006. At that time it also named cyberspace as one of its mission domains, along with air and space.

Wynne announced the official inauguration of the Cyber Command Sept. 19 at Barksdale. The U.S. 8th Air Force will continue to conduct day-to-day cyber operations until the Cyber Command is fully operational, which is expected in October 2009. the service said.

Buxbaum is a freelance writer in Bethesda, Md.

About the Author

Peter Buxbaum is a special contributor to Defense Systems.

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