Congress passes continuing resolution

The government’s work will continue at least through Nov. 16.

The Senate passed a continuing resolution Sept. 27 making appropriations for fiscal 2008. The House passed its version Sept. 26, and next, President Bush must sign the legislation.

The resolution avoids a government showdown and gives agencies money to continue their work from fiscal 2007. However, the legislation allows only a most limited amount of funding for agencies’ projects.

One senator voted against the resolution. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) said in a statement he was disappointed that Congress had not passed any appropriations bills. He was more upset, though, that the resolution provides additional funding for the war in Iraq.

“We should not be giving the president a blank check to continue a war that is hurting our national security,” Feingold said.

Congress has not enacted enact a single fiscal 2008 appropriations bill. Although the House passed 12 bills before the August break, the Senate has approved four of them. The House and Senate have passed the Homeland Security Department appropriations bill, Military Construction and Veterans Affairs appropriations bill, Department of State and Foreign Operations appropriations bill, and the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development appropriations bill.

Meanwhile, the White House has threatened to veto spending bills that provide funding above the president's budget request. In a speech Sept. 25, President Bush said he also would veto a massive trillion-dollar bill compiled of the 12 outstanding appropriations measures.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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