Letter: GSA praises Power Player

All of us at the General Services Administration were very proud to see Martha Dorris named as one of Federal Computer Week's 2007 Power Players. Although it is true that Martha is president of the American Council for Technology, we know her -- and your readers should know her -- as GSA's deputy associate administrator for citizen services. It is in that role that she manages the cutting-edge programs that simplify citizens' access to official government information and services. Have a question or need information on just about anything government-related and you'll get it from Martha's group by e-mail or phone, through publications distributed from Pueblo, Colo., or the Web via USA.gov or its Hispanic counterpart, GobiernoUSA.gov. This year, Brown University designated USA.gov as the No. 1 Web site in the federal government and Time magazine named USA.gov one of the "25 Sites We Can't Live Without." Martha epitomizes the ideal public servant. She's bright, talented and thriving in a job she loves and the satisfaction it brings. And although it's great that she's been selected as one of FCW's top 14 Power Players, with us she places first in her dedication and achievements accomplished in her day job. That job happens to be at GSA.


Anonymous
Office of Citizens Services and Communications
General Services Administration

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