OMB promotes Shea

Robert Shea has a new position at the Office of Management and Budget. He now will be associate director for administration and government performance, the Bush administration announced today.

Shea had been associate director for management since 2006 and previously counsel to Clay Johnson, OMB’s deputy director for management, when Shea joined the administration in 2001.

With his newest title, Shea’s roles will not change dramatically. He still will lead the Performance Improvement initiative, administer the Performance Assessment Ratings Tool and lead the implementation of the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act. But now he also will manage OMB’s internal affairs.

The agency has not fared well in meeting the objectives of the President’s Management Agenda. In the fiscal 2007 third-quarter score card, OMB received three yellow marks in e-government, human capital and performance improvements and two red scores in financial performance and competitive sourcing. A green score means an agency is meeting or exceeding the criteria in one of the agenda’s categories.

Before coming to OMB, Shea worked in the House and Senate in positions including overseeing the Government Performance and Results Act and Chief Financial Officers Act implementations.

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