Former NSA official joins Capitol College

W. Victor Maconachy, who headed the National Security Agency ’s National Information Assurance Education and Training Program, has been appointed vice president and chief academic officer at Capitol College.

Previously, Maconachy was deputy senior computer science authority at NSA’s Central Security Service, where he concentrated on building a program that will develop the next generation of cryptologic computer scientists. His main responsibilities included researching and implementing a master’s degree in computer science, and expanding NSA’s work with the service academies. 

Between January 2005 and June 2006, Maconachy was the program manager for NSA’s National Information Assurance Education and Training Program. He was responsible for implementing a multidimensional, interagency program that maintains the courseware standards for information assurance curricula at higher education institutions nationwide.  These standards ensure the professional competency of Defense Department, military and other federal workers who are involved in the day-to-day operation of the nation’s information infrastructure.


Maconachy spent 10 years as chairman of the Awareness, Training and Education Working Group of the President’s Committee for National Security Systems. He is also a founder, past chairman and member of the Colloquium for Information Systems Security Education, which recognizes excellence in college and university information assurance training and education programs.

Maconachy authored more than 30 publications and delivered more than 65 conference and university presentations on information assurance and information systems security.  He is the recipient of numerous awards for professional accomplishment, including the DOD Meritorious Service Medal.

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