OMB promotes Young to deputy administrator

The Office of Management and Budget promoted Tim Young today to deputy administrator in the Office of E-Government and Information Technology.

Young had been the associate administrator in the same office for more than three years and has worked at OMB since 2003.

In the new position, Young will add oversight of enterprise architecture, capital planning, IT policy and cybersecurity to his portfolio, which already includes the 25 e-government initiatives, the nine lines of business projects and the e-government portion of the President’s Management Agenda, according to the OMB press release.

The promotion also places Young on the same level as other principal deputies in OMB, according to the agency's organizational chart.

Before becoming associate administrator, Young managed the internal efficiency and effectiveness portfolio of the e-government initiatives.

During his tenure, he has built a strong reputation with agencies and industry in terms of collaboration and as a problem-solver. Throughout his time at OMB, Young has overseen many of the nine lines of business initiatives and has been a strong supporter of improving government online services.

Before joining OMB, Young was a senior consultant at BearingPoint.

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