USAID to look for IT support

The U.S. Agency for International Development plans to solicit information technology support for its humanitarian and foreign disaster assistance programs.

Last week, USAID told contractors it will request proposals early next year for end-to-end information and communications technology support for its Office of Foreign Disaster and Assistance and the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance.

The agency predicts that the acquisition will be for one base year with four option years. The government anticipates paying $45 million for the five-year span.

The request for proposals will accept applications from small and large businesses. The tentative timeline for the project is to issue the RFP Jan. 30, 2008, and make an award June 4, 2008.

The contractor will be responsible for supporting the three OFDA offices located in the Washington area and six field offices worldwide. The contractor will be responsible for:


  • Program management.

  • Operations and maintenance.

  • Systems development.

  • Communications and field operations support.

  • IT equipment procurement and warehousing.

  • Network connectivity.

  • Facility support.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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