Bureaucracy hurts homeland security, Bush aide says

The bureaucratic structure in the executive and legislative branches is one of the main limitations on the Bush administration’s homeland security initiatives, the deputy assistant to the president for homeland security, said today.

“The Department of Homeland Security still has 88 oversight committees in Congress,” Joel Bagnal said at the 2nd annual National Congress for Secure Communities.

He called for a consolidation of the congressional review process for homeland security initiatives similar to that which the House and Senate Congressional Armed Services committees have regarding military oversight.

Bagnal said the executive branch’s homeland security apparatus also needs to be reformed to comprise operational teams that focus on specific homeland and national security missions to prevent redundancy.

The executive branch does a “pretty effective job of coordination now with respect to homeland security issues, but we do a horrible job of integration and synchronization,” he added.

Delegates from more than 40 states gathered in Washington Dec. 17 and 18 for the conference to come up with new ideas for the National Blueprint for Secure Communities.

About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.