Letter: Ferriss’ ideas ring true

Regarding “Welles: The fed 4-hour work week?”: Having worked in the entertainment industry as an executive assistant for high-profile individuals, I can't agree with Timothy Ferriss' suggestions enough.

I left my job as an executive assistant to create a hybrid outsourcing company to provide the exact sort of support that Ferriss suggests for a healthier, happier and more successful lifestyle. I refer to my employees as "gittels," and they provide premium assistance on demand -- from research needs to mundane tasks.

Life has become such a fast-paced proposition that anyone who hopes to be successful in their own right must realize that they will need support in their daily needs to allow them to focus on their goals and their expertise that will get them their brass ring!

Whether it is publicity-related goals, delegating tasks or researching business plan information, gittels are the wave of the future. We are not your average temps, and that is an important trend for would-be entrepreneurs to know exists.

Thank you for your informative article.

Chayah Masters
Los Angeles


What do you think? Paste a comment in the box below (registration required), or send your comment to letters@fcw.com (subject line: Blog comment) and we'll post it.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.