Northrop Grumman names new acquisition policy director

Northrop Grumman has named Mitchell Waldman director of acquisition policy. As such, Waldman will be responsible for coordinating the company's efforts related to pending and upcoming acquisition regulations and policy at the Defense Department and other government agencies, internal coordination of congressional activities related to acquisition policy and reform, and representing the company at numerous acquisition and related professional associations. 


Before joining Northrop Grumman, Waldman was national security adviser to former Sen. Trent Lott. Before that, Waldman held several executive positions in the Navy, including deputy assistant secretary for ship programs, director of cost engineering and industrial analysis for Naval Sea Systems Command, and deputy program manager for Amphibious Warfare Programs. He was also project manager for the U.S. Navy's Small Boat Security Assistance Program and completed several senior-level staff assignments with the Navy and the Defense Department.


Waldman has won the U.S. Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award, the Secretary of Defense General Counsel Outstanding Performance Award and the D.C. City Council of Engineering Societies Architect of the Year award.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.