DHS names five centers of excellence

The Homeland Security Department has named five new centers of excellence in counterterrorism research. Each will receive a grant of as much as $2 million a year for four to six years, the department said. The centers are:

  • Border Security and Immigration: The University of Arizona at Tucson and University of Texas at El Paso.

  • Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response: Northeastern University in Boston and the University of Rhode Island in Kingston.

  • Maritime, Island and Port Security: The University of Hawaii in Honolulu and Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J.

  • Natural Disasters, Coast Infrastructure and Emergency Management: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss.

  • Transportation Security: Texas Southern University, in Houston, Tougaloo College in Tougaloo, Miss., and the University of Connecticut in Storrs.


The centers conduct scientific research that eventually is used in counterrorism products and services. Federal contractors sometimes establish relationships with such centers or with their research faculty.

Alice Lipowicz writes for Washington Technology, an 1105 Government Information Group publication.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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