2008 Federal 100: Doers with vision

This is the 19th year for Federal Computer Week’s Federal 100 awards program.

That means members of the 2008 Fed 100 class join 1,800 previous winners who have been recognized for their work.

Each year, the list of winners has a personality of its own. Some years, the Fed 100 awards present an opportunity to recognize remarkable work that comes out of tragedy, calamity or disaster. In 2002, for example, government and industry responses to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, largely determined the winners. And the 2006 awards recognized good work done in response to Hurricane Katrina.

The past year, however, was not defined by any particular event. We are thankful for that. Yet, in some ways, it can be more difficult to go above and beyond in our day-to-day lives than in response to a crisis.
It is also particularly challenging to be a leader in a government moving toward transition.

This year’s Fed 100 winners comprise a fascinating group. They are not only leaders but also doers. They are people who have refined strategic outlooks, but they are also adept tacticians. The 2008 Federal 100 award list is interesting because it covers such a wide gamut of people and positions.

Top leaders of the community — from government and industry — are represented along with people who are on the front lines.

If a common thread runs through the 2008 list, it is people who were willing not only to change but also to embrace change. We all acknowledge that the pace of change keeps getting faster, and many benefits come from that faster pace as agencies become more agile and are able to share more. But it can be difficult for an organization the size of most government agencies — let alone the entire government — to keep up with that pace. Many of the people profiled in the following pages represent a special breed of visionaries — people who see how to get things done.

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