Letter: Basic information in acquisitions goes a long way

Regarding, "Kelman: The not-so-obvious lesson," a reader writes: Steve - your point is an excellent one and is all too often overlooked. Contract specialists need to be encouraged to make
themselves operationally knowledgeable about what they are procuring so that the method of acquisition and the subsequent management of the contract are complementary to the requirement.

Knowing what and why you are buying something is critical to developing an acquisition strategy,
be it for a small or large buy, that considers all of the business considerations that must be address just as assuredly as the regulatory requirements. It is an understanding of such requirements that has prompted the Defense Acquisition University, and some of its equivalently rated partners, to include material related to how industry perceives the risks of Government contracting from the early-planning stages to project completion and close-out. It is a genuine attempt to introduce
an understanding of business concerns into the contracting process.

Anonymous

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