CTO: make a business case for Web 2.0

Government champions of Web 2.0 technology such as blogs and wikis must give their upper management solid examples of how those applications can be used by agencies, according to Tim Schmidt, the Transportation Department's chief technology officer.

Speaking April 16 at the Advanced Learning Institute’s Social Media for Government conference in Alexandria, Va., Schmidt said although Web 2.0 offers many benefits, members of upper management are resistant to using it because they fear new technology. He noted that senior executives once expressed similar reservations about personal computers and e-mail.

To counter that resistance, Schmidt said Web 2.0 advocates must make concrete business cases based on facts, and use information from analysts at companies such as Forrester and Gartner to add weight to their positions.

Arguments against Web 2.0 should be considered and countered with prepared answers, he said.

“Point out that it’s less expensive to use Web 2.0,” Schmidt said. “Some of these technologies, dollar for dollar, are much cheaper if you put them out there correctly.”

Schmidt said Web 2.0 pioneers must prepare briefing packages they can present to key people at a moment's notice.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.