Treasury to compete $300 million contract

The Treasury Department will conduct an open competition for its Information Technology Infrastructure Managed Services contract the agency projects to be valued at $300 million.

The services will replace Treasury’s current General Services Administration Seat Contract, which expires in September 2009, the department said in its posting April 25 on Federal Business Opportunities.

Treasury intends to release a capability request on May 16, conduct an industry day on June 23 and anticipate the release of the full solicitation on Aug. 29, the department said.

The single award of an indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract would have a base period of three years. The department expects to use a variety of contract types, including firm-fixed price, and time and material, and contract line-item numbers to support IT services for its offices and bureaus.

The proposed contract will define seven areas of IT services: local-area network infrastructure operations; data center operations; end-user support and hardware; IT security; disaster recovery and continuity of operations; engineering services and development/test lab operations, and IT process and program management.

About the Author

Mary Mosquera is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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