Letter: Young employees are sources of IT knowledge

Regarding "CIO: Young workers create new headaches": Don't blame the younger generation just because you don't understand the technology enough to write good security policies!  Has anyone ever thought to include some of the younger workers in creating IT security since they do seem to understand the technology?  I fail to see the real security threat of young people who use technology just because they "know how stuff works." 

In my agency, most of the IT support is run by younger individuals and their knowledge is considered an advantage, not a "headache."  And I don't know anyone doing secure work from a coffee shop, but I have seen plenty of senior executives working from air port and hotel lobbies.  Can anyone explain the difference here?  These are also the same people with BlackBerrys permanently attached to their hip, not the younger, new employees.  I don't think the young people are the problem here.  When are government employers going to learn that the younger workers can contribute, instead of treating them like a "headache?"


Anonymous


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