Letter: Government needs qualified new feds and managers

Regarding, "Groups choose winning workforce idea": When I entered the [federal government] more than 30 years ago, applicants for federal jobs took the Federal Service Entrance Examination, a test that evaluated the entire spectrum of their knowledge. Agencies evaluated candidates' education and experience, and then determined which were most qualified to meet their needs. I was placed in contract negotiator's intern program because I had degrees in science and humanities (English). I received my business training in intensive courses offered by DOD.

I am now a journeyman contracting officer who has been told he is no longer promotable because I do not have a business degree. I have seen many recent hires, and even after their training, they do not seem as prepared as we were after my class of liberal arts grads left ALMC (Army Logistics Mgt. Center). We went from school almost directly to confrontation with the best and biggest in private industry. The government no longer invests enough time and effort into its new hires.

Newcomers are not mentored or shown the ropes. Too many managers know too little about the acquisition process to adequately manage or inform their personnel. The main function of SES is to slap Band-aids on problems and congratulate each other on what a great job they're doing.

Anonymous

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