Letter: Better integration of employees will help government stay competitive

Regarding "Report: 'Onboarding' helps retain employees": My entire career was in federal HR. The Day 1 experience of most new federal employees is miserable!  They must complete a ton of largely duplicative paperwork on their first day and then show up in their new managers office and...surprise...there in no available cube or phone or computer, etc.  "You couldn't get a user ID and password anyway because you have to complete security training and the first available slot is in two weeks." 

[Office of Personnel Management] published a spec for an EOD system capability in 1/2007 and a few companies like Monster and Northrop Grumman are developing EODs that match that spec.  THANK HEAVENS!  Now, the government might be in a better position to compete.


Anonymous

What do you think? Paste a comment in the box below (registration required), or send your comment to letters@fcw.com (subject line: Blog comment) and we'll post it.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.

Featured

  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Thu, May 22, 2008 M M

This post is priceless. Straight from the trenches and it shows how the Federal work environment is dysfunctional from the word go. That has to set a tone for the workforce. Imagine how much money the government spends on applications and IT and new federal employees are still filling out duplicative paperwork on their first day. I am hoping that in my lifetime they can fill out that data once via an internet interface before they get to their first day. Honestly, isn't most of the information needed about 80-90% the same for all agencies? Isn't most of it provided once already in the application process. (Maybe I shouldn't get into the application process.) I am hopeful that folks at OPM will see this employees post and start thinking outside the paper form. Surely we already spend enough to have the future now. And the savings to be had!

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group