Career federal IT exec Suda to retire

Robert Suda, a longtime federal information technology executive, said today he plans to retire Aug. 1. He has been acting director of the Transportation Department’s Volpe National Transportation Systems Center since January. The Volpe Center is developing intelligent systems to help solve transportation problems.

Paul Brubaker, administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration at Transportation, the center’s parent, brought Suda in to search for a permanent director, put in place a new organization and assess its administrative functions.


“These activities are very close to being complete,” Suda said in an e-mail that announced his plan to retire after 31 years in the federal government. He expects to work in the private sector but has no definite plans as yet, he said.

Before coming to the Volpe Center, Suda was associate chief information officer of integration and operations at the Agriculture Department. Suda was the first of several department information technology career executives to leave USDA’s Office of the Chief Information Officer between December and March.

Suda has also served as assistant commissioner of the Office of Information Technology Solutions at the General Service Administration’s Federal Technology Service. Before that, he was chief financial officer of FTS and  managed the governmentwide SmartBuy program for enterprise software licensing.

About the Author

Mary Mosquera is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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