Letter: Who benefits from biometrics use?

Regarding "Bush pushes biometrics for national security": Warrantless wiretaps, surveillance satellites, video cameras and who knows what other equipment are used to collect massive amounts of information on individuals every day. That information is fed into huge databases without the general public's knowledge. Bush decided that is not enough so he needs biometrics, too, which obviously will not be limited to suspects and known terrorists. While the Pentagon cannot track billions of U.S. taxpayer money in Iraq, but spends billions on developing ways to track U.S. citizens is astonishing.

What criteria specifically is used to deem someone a "threat" to national security or is it based on Bush's instinct? Have we, the people, become the enemy? Or perhaps Bush is helping out his buddies who specialize in surveillance technology. After all, three of the telecoms (AT&T, Sprint and Verizon) alone increased their federal contract revenue in FY 2006 by $2.6 billion dollars. Other companies specializing in surveillance methods, equipment etc. are making hand-over-fist in profit, too.

Technological advancements geared more for increasing ways for the government to [survey] its citizens rather than for bettering the human condition ought to give us pause.

Furthermore this begs asking whether biometrics are meant to better serve national security or corporate interests? Perhaps Bush would like to explain that. However, I will not be holding my breath waiting for him to do so.

Mindy Huie

What do you think? Paste a comment in the box below (registration required), or send your comment to letters@fcw.com (subject line: Blog comment) and we'll post it.

Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.