Accord might avert furloughs

Republican and Democratic leaders in the House reached an accord with the Bush administration on emergency funding for the administration’s global war on terrorism.

The House approved a measure last week that will likely forestall a controversial Defense Department contingency plan to furlough nonessential civilian employees in the absence of adequate supplemental funding.

Deputy Secretary of Defense Gordon England outlined a contingency plan for continuing operations if  Congress does not appropriate supplemental 2008 funding for the war on terrorism. In a June 9 memo, England gave DOD department heads until June 30 to estimate the number of employees who could be furloughed if Congress hasn’t appropriated the money.

A major portion of the Bush administration’s request for supplemental funding for the war on terror, including disputed appropriations for the war in Iraq, has stalled in Congress for more than 15 months. The House measure would provide $162 billion for the war on terrorism for the next 12 months.

England wrote that non-essential operations would be shut down if funding isn’t available. Civilian employees not engaged in those essential activities would be furloughed and put in a “nonwork, nonpay status,” according to the memo.

The American Federation of Government Employees, an employee union, called the memo a scare tactic.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Shutterstock photo id 669226093 By Gorodenkoff

    The disinformation game

    The federal government is poised to bring new tools and strategies to bear in the fight against foreign-backed online disinformation campaigns, but how and when they choose to act could have ramifications on the U.S. political ecosystem.

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.