GSA's Bibb will retire in September

David Bibb, acting administrator at the General Services Administration, announced his retirement today. His last day will be Sept. 1, the agency said.

Bibb plans to enter the real estate industry after he retires, GSA said.

Bibb has been contemplating retirement since the fall of 2007, he said in a press release. “I’ve had the privilege to work alongside some of the most dedicated, brightest, hardworking people you will find anywhere in government,” he said.


In a memo to GSA employees, Bibb wrote, “Together, we have experienced enormous change over the past few years. Together, we have also turned a critical corner. Based on continuing business resurgence plus personal intuition built over more than three decades, I know GSA will retain its title as the government’s undisputed premier procurement agency.”


Bibb began his career with GSA in 1971 as a management intern at the agency's Atlanta office. Since then, he has had several executive-level positions, including assistant commissioner of planning and deputy commissioner at GSA’s Public Buildings Service. He was also deputy associate administrator of real property at GSA’s Office of Governmentwide Policy. He has been deputy administrator since 2003 and acting administrator since former Administrator Lurita Doan resigned in April.


While at GSA, Bibb helped develop of a number of innovative environmental and workplace initiatives that have now become standard practice at GSA, the agency said.

Bibb has received the Presidential Rank Award of Distinguished Executive and is a two-time recipient of the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive. He also has twice received the Administrator’s Distinguished Service Award, GSA’s highest honor.

About the Author

Matthew Weigelt is a freelance journalist who writes about acquisition and procurement.

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