Input: Candidates share some priorities

he government is slowing down many of its acquisition and operational activities as the presidential election draws closer, on the assumption that the new administration will set its own priorities.

However, according to market research firm Input, the two leading candidates share some priorities that are already clear. In advice aimed primarily at contractors, the company urged an emphasis on those common interests.


Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) is expected to become the Democratic nominee and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) is his party's presumptive nominee. Their roles will become official at their parties' respective conventions.


Regardless of who wins the White House, Input researchers said, the war effort will continue to lead the federal information technology budget.  But McCain and Obama both emphasize health care reform, energy efficiency and homeland security, according to Input.


“Solutions that address business improvement and infrastructure and application modernization will be key opportunity areas for contractors,” said Deniece Peterson, senior analyst at Input.  “Information sharing, health IT, green IT, and unified communications are very promising areas for investment because all of the candidates recognize the role they can play in improving how government operates and delivers services.”

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

Featured

  • Image: Shutterstock

    COVID, black swans and gray rhinos

    Steven Kelman suggests we should spend more time planning for the known risks on the horizon.

  • IT Modernization
    businessman dragging old computer monitor (Ollyy/Shutterstock.com)

    Pro-bono technologists look to help cash-strapped states struggling with legacy systems

    As COVID-19 exposed vulnerabilities in state and local government IT systems, the newly formed U.S. Digital Response stepped in to help.

Stay Connected