Reader comment roundup: Mandatory public service with a catch and more ideas

Regarding "Editorial: A call to service": Note that one presidential candidate fully endorses the scope of service to country laid out in the editorial, and then some. The other, a self-described maverick, does not do so and implies that military service is the only one that counts. He needs to get out more.
Michael Lent


Regarding "Editorial: A call to service": Uh, no. Mandatory public service is involuntary servitude, no matter how you slice it. (This does include the draft- SCOTUS was flat-out wrong in that famous court case in the early 1900s.) But I would support making it a quid pro quo. Want federal aid for college? Fine, sign a contract to work "X" number of years at a designated grade level, as soon as you graduate. And if you don't graduate, you have to pay the money back.
Anonymous


Regarding "Navy opens contract to small firms": Mr. [Tim] Foreman last week was at the 4th Annual National Veterans Business Conference telling SDVOSBs [Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses] that the U.S. Navy supports the SDV Program and the President's Executive Order. This agreement between SBA and the Navy proves that the primary focus of both Small Business Administration and Navy is just one program and that is the 8a program.

Mr. Foreman actions speak louder than words prove your support of the SDV Program!
Anonymous


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