Bill would create nanotech clearinghouse

A Senate bill to reauthorize funding for nanotechnology research would mandate creating a publicly available database of the projects funded in several areas, including environmental, educational and nanomanufacturing.

The National Nanotechnology Initiative Amendments Act of 2008 (S.3274), before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, would reauthorize the National Nanotechnology Initiative. The bill seeks to better prioritize research and development activities.

The initiative was established in 2001 to coordinate federal nanotechnology R&D. It serves as a central point for communication, cooperation and collaboration for 13 participating federal agencies.

The bill would establish the National Nanotechnology Advisory Panel — a body independent from existing advisory committees, which would be responsible for recommending an appropriate funding level for the environmental, health and safety program areas.

The measure would also provide consistent funding for the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office through the participating federal agencies.

The House began considering a companion bill in May.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.