Louisiana gets a new CIO


The state of Louisiana has named Edward Driesse, a technology executive with experience in both the public and private sectors, to serve as its new chief information officer. The appointment was made by Louisiana Administration Commissioner Angele Davis.


Previously, Driesse was CIO for the Louisiana Health and Hospitals Department. Before that, he was CIO for AECOM Technology Corp. of Los Angeles. In another job with Foster Wheeler Ltd., Driesse oversaw the global deployment of an integrated applications system.


As Louisiana’s CIO, Driesse will direct the Information Technology Office housed within the Administration Division. He will serve as the lead person within the state responsible for matters related to information technology and will be responsible for developing and executing IT technical and business strategy.


In addition, he will advise the governor and executive cabinet on IT policy and the purchase and management of IT resources.


Driesse holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a master’s degree in computer sciences. Both degrees were earned at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


About the Author

William Welsh is a freelance writer covering IT and defense technology.

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