Waxman calls for Scott Bloch's resignation

The chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has urged the beleaguered head of the White House Office of Special Counsel to step down.


In a letter dated July 28. Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), told Scott Bloch, special counsel, "I have concluded that OSC would be better served with new leadership and urge you to step down."


The Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group, released Waxman's letter. POGO Executive Director Danielle Brian had written to Joshua Bolten, the White House chief of staff, earlier in July asking him to remove Bloch. And in May, Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.), the ranking minority member of the oversight committee, urged Bloch to resign.


Bloch, whose duties include protecting whistle-blowers, has been the target of a long-running Office of Personnel Management probe related to a variety of allegations including mistreatment of employees, political bias and obstruction of justice. In 2006 Bloch hired a commercial firm to erase the hard drives of three computers in what his critics believe was an effort to destroy evidence.


Earlier this month, James Byrne, the most senior career official at the OSC, resigned and called for Bloch's replacement, according to Waxman. In Byrne's resignation letter, which Waxman quoted, he said, "the mission, independence, and very existence of the Office of Special Counsel are -- and shall remain -- at risk."


 

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Shutterstock photo id 669226093 By Gorodenkoff

    The disinformation game

    The federal government is poised to bring new tools and strategies to bear in the fight against foreign-backed online disinformation campaigns, but how and when they choose to act could have ramifications on the U.S. political ecosystem.

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.